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Table 2 Health care access and perceptions of mental health among the study participants

From: Mental health and access to care among refugee mothers relocated to San Diego: a comparative study of Iraqi and Somali refugee communities

Health care access variable Iraqi (N = 219) Somali (N = 198) P value
Usual venue to seek care when ill
 Doctor’s office/private clinic
 Community health center/public clinic
 Hospital, ER, other / No regular place, don’t know
43 (19.63)
168 (76.71)
8 (3.65)
162 (81.82)
25 (12.63)
11 (5.56)
< 0.001
Regular doctor/nurse/midwife
 Yes
 No
 Don’t know
200 (91.32)
17 (7.76)
2 (0.91)
176 (88.89)
17 (8.59)
5 (2.53)
0.414
Time in last 12 months when postponed med care
 Yes
 No
 Don’t know
67 (30.59)
152 (69.41)
0 (0.00)
73 (36.87)
105 (53.03)
20 (10.10)
< 0.001
Of those who postponed med care, it was because of
 Cost
 Some other reason
 Don’t know
 Refused
8 (11.94)
55 (82.10)
3 (4.48)
1 (1.49)
13 (17.81)
48 (65.75)
12 (16.44)
0 (0.00)
0.046
Went to a mental health care provider when you needed to
 Yes
 No
 Did not need to
 Refused
 Don’t know
40 (18.26)
47 (21.15)
132 (60.27)
0 (0.00)
0 (0.00)
124 (62.63)
36 (18.18)
17 (8.59)
5 (2.53)
16 (8.08)
< 0.001
Stigmaa
 No
 Yes
39 (82.98)
8 (17.02)
35 (97.22)
1 (2.63)
0.086
  1. aThe participant was classified as having a stigma against mental health care based on responding both (1) “no” to whether they had seen a mental health care provider when they needed to and (2) the reason for it being: “I was afraid my family would know about it” or “I was afraid my friends, and larger community here would know about it.”